Project CARS 2 Nighttigers's Step-by-Step Setup Guide (1 Viewer)

Cluck

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I really hope the 10% means that the system tries to limit tire slip to 10%. On just longitudinal acceleration 10-15% maybe 20% on some tires is the value that gives best acceleration. When lateral forces from cornering are being added 8-12% longitudinal tire slip is about the limit on most cars.

With the red flashing hud I wondered about that too at some point but I have no clue, it surely does not indicate 0.0 travel or height, it must be something else maybe damper speed related maybe something for debugging that was left in the game.
The TC numeric value is indeed how much slip is allowed, not how much TC is applied. As such, 99% slip will allow for the most slip and loss of traction, with minimal interference from TC. For what it's worth, this is how RaceLogic's traction control systems worked and yes, with the digital version you could dial in exactly the amount of slip you wanted, from 0% to 100% (off). They were fitted to some editions of the Gumpert Apollo and featured on Top Gear with Richard Hammond presenting that segment - I only remember it because I bought and fitted the same system on my Nissan 200SX.

EDIT: Further to that, they worked on the simple basis of measuring the difference in wheel speeds from the ABS sensors - as soon as the measured wheels exceeded a threshold of speed difference, the traction control would cut the ignition spark (with the amount of cut getting more aggressive if slip was still being detected). It made for some quite awesome flames as a load of unburnt fuel was promptly dumped into a lovely hot exhaust ;).
 
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Diluvian

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Anyone know how would you interpret this?

View attachment 4382

It doesn't quite seem to fit under anything in your guide. I don't actually know what telemetry is trying to tell me. Just a moment before, the travel was at 0.2, but no red message. a moment later at 0.7 it decides red is the way forward.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
I have the same problems, correctly interpreting the numbers and the red-color.
 

The Breeze

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I'll add it in the future together with the livetrack and wet weather setups!
Definitely need some hints and tips for wet setups. Can start from scratch but maybe there are some tips when you start with a good dry weather setup? What you definitely should change for a wet track? Brake bias more to rear, higher ride height to prevent aquaplaning, et cetera.
What to change if you do not know what the weather will be later in the race (tactics), and what to change if you know it will get wetter and wetter?
 

Jamesl91

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What to change if you do not know what the weather will be later in the race (tactics), and what to change if you know it will get wetter and wetter?
I would start with what you know, so we know first race is light rain and start of 2nd race is rain, so make a wet setup, then once your happy with it test it in the dry and see if it works if not you will have to compromise although staying on track in the wet will be more important
 

Gosku

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@The Breeze usually when i do wet setup first thing i do is a good dry setup because doing setup changes on a rain is much harder as conditions change all the time but when i go into wet changes first i try to find the correct brake bias which is usually more or less to the rear. Next i add a bit power ramp on diff to give bit more balance on corner exit and after take some camber off to maximize braking power(if needed add coast and preload also). Then i try to make car a bit more softer using springs and arb because speeds are bit slower so car handles a bit better. I wouldnt touch aero too much as it doesnt have too matter too much because of slower cornering speeds so less aero effect and lower straight line speeds so lower drag. And as james said if its shifting conditions try to find balance where you lose less time overall so depending on the weathers changing point might be worth of doing minimal setup changes for wet just that u keep it on the track to maximize your dry pace.
 

drukqs

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@Nighttiger can you please clarify me the asymmetric camber recommendation?

In example Catalunya GP has a lot of fast right handers: if i want to run an asymmetric setup the wheels that should have more camber should be the right hand side wheels (inside wheels when cornering to the right side). This seems counter intuitive to me because the car tilts to the outside...but maybe i'm wrong.

Care to clarify? thanks!

One suggestion: the differential, i only recently discovered that 'increasing' settings means actually decreasing the degrees :). Maybe it's something you can update to make it clearer!
 

miagi

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@Nighttiger can you please clarify me the asymmetric camber recommendation?

In example Catalunya GP has a lot of fast right handers: if i want to run an asymmetric setup the wheels that should have more camber should be the right hand side wheels (inside wheels when cornering to the right side). This seems counter intuitive to me because the car tilts to the outside...but maybe i'm wrong.

Care to clarify? thanks!

One suggestion: the differential, i only recently discovered that 'increasing' settings means actually decreasing the degrees :). Maybe it's something you can update to make it clearer!
You would go more negativ camber on the left side of the car than on the right side. For example FL: -3.3° FR: -2.5°

About the differential it's explained in the game and definitions can be different, you always need to see how particular game is doing it.
 

drukqs

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thanks @miagi then i'm not sure if it's explaining properly on the guide regarding the asymmetric camber :D
 

miagi

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Yes there is a mistake.

"Algarve for example
has a lot of faster left right hand corners and almost 0 quick right left handers,
[...]
Having less camber on the right side also helps with cornering in left turns because more of the tyre contact patch is available if the car
tilts over to the left when taking a left corner.
on corners with medium lateral acceleration."
 

The Breeze

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@Nighttiger , referring to the brake ducts part of the guide:

"You should aim for around 390 degrees on your brakes when entering a big braking
zone
. Steel brakes have a optimal working temperature of about 600°C, while Carbon
discs work best above 900 degrees."

Does this mean 390 degrees before entering a big braking zone for both, steel and carbon?
 

Jamesl91

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@Nighttiger , referring to the brake ducts part of the guide:

"You should aim for around 390 degrees on your brakes when entering a big braking
zone
. Steel brakes have a optimal working temperature of about 600°C, while Carbon
discs work best above 900 degrees."

Does this mean 390 degrees before entering a big braking zone for both, steel and carbon?
For optimal performance when breaking you need to have hot brakes, brakes that are too cold can cause your tires to lock easier. The state of your brake temps is highly dependant on the car, the Formula Renault will require hotter temps than a gt4.

I think what Nighttiger is referring to is the overall temps when not braking, so going down the straights you would expect to see the brakes at around 400 degrees. This you can optimise by testing different brake duct settings, having more closed duct will keep the brakes at a hotter temps with the added benefit of increasing tire pressures.
 

Puffpirat

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To add to that, another approach would be to looks at max temps in the braking zones. Running the pCars profiler or any telemetry app is highly beneficial here. You don't want steel brakes to shoot above say 650°C and carbon above 1000°C. If you constantly go above these values in the braking zones, your brakes will wear out dramatically and also brake pressure will fade.

What's interesting and nicely modeled in pc2 is, a car with a full tank of fuel needs bigger ducts, as there is more kinetic energy to slow down than with a car in qualy trim on low fuel.
 

Puffpirat

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I don’t think you can directly see it ingame. I actually googled a few cars, eg LMP3 which uses steel brakes where LMP2 has carbon.

An easy indicator is, go out of the pits in a practice session, brake, if they don’t bite at all they’re carbon. Steel brakes bite a little bit even cold fresh out of the box.

Also with default ducts the cars on steel tend to be in the 500 degree range during braking where cars with carbon brakes are higher up like 800.
 

UnstopaPaul

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I think what Nighttiger is referring to is the overall temps when not braking, so going down the straights you would expect to see the brakes at around 400 degrees. This you can optimise by testing different brake duct settings, having more closed duct will keep the brakes at a hotter temps with the added benefit of increasing tire pressures.
You don't want steel brakes to shoot above say 650°C and carbon above 1000°C. If you constantly go above these values in the braking zones, your brakes will wear out dramatically and also brake pressure will fade.
What is slightly unclear to me is whether this is tuning for endurance only. That is to say if my brakes are always at 1400°C under heavy braking, which of these two is it
  1. my brake pressure fade immediately on that corner, because 1400 is not optimal for carbon brakes
  2. pressure will it fade over time because of brake damage, but on the earlier laps 1400 is not an immediate problem
  3. beneficial immediately and over time.
 

miagi

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What is slightly unclear to me is whether this is tuning for endurance only. That is to say if my brakes are always at 1400°C under heavy braking, which of these two is it
  1. my brake pressure fade immediately on that corner, because 1400 is not optimal for carbon brakes
  2. pressure will it fade over time because of brake damage, but on the earlier laps 1400 is not an immediate problem
  3. beneficial immediately and over time.
It depends on the track. Some tracks like Spa can get the brake temps quite low before the bus stop chicane and quite high in La Source. But after La Source there is a long way where they cool down again. Bathurst , Monza and Le Mans 24h are also special about brake temps and tends to use a wide range over the run of one lap.
Also the ingame hud shows the surface temperature of the brakes (either brake discs or pads, don't know). When you brake the surface temperature peaks but also goes down quickly. Some heat stays in the system and after the surface peak fades the system is warmer than before. It cools with air flow over time. It depends on the brakes if it rather has an issue with too low temps or too high. Some carbon brakes can lose a lot of braking potential if too cold. While steel brakes (and cc-brakes) are rather fine about that but can't be run as high as carbon brakes. The FR3.5 has rather no problem running brakes at 100-200°C but peaking towards and beyond ~1000°C in the Hud there is some degradation noticeable. Usually then also due to more heat on the front the brake balance shifts towards the rear axis, what can be dangerous.

1. Generally you want as little drag from the brake ducts as possible.
2. You want to prevent your brakes from running too hot.
3. If your tire temps are high you want to run your brakes cooler to no increase the tire temp problem by brake temps.

You need to balance this factors for you, your driving and your general car setup.
 
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UnstopaPaul

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thanks for the reply, but I guess I was not clear enough.

You want to prevent your brakes from running too hot.
I get this, but does this matter for an individual lap (ie your brakes are terrible at 1400) or is it only a factor that starts to cause brake damage, and it is that damage that causes poor brake performance.
 

Gosku

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I think if you hit 1400 on the first couple of laps the core temps of the brakes havent gone up and you might notice a drop off when they go up
 

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